Scriptorium Publishing

content strategy for technical communication

Typos are the bane (and the reality) of my existence

A few weeks ago at the STC conference, we were distributing printed copies of our latest white paper, Friend or Foe? Web 2.0 in Technical Communication. We had some really good feedback from attendees; one person made a point of coming by the booth a second time to tell us she had enjoyed reading the paper.

Another reader with whom I had a lengthy discussion also returned to let us know that she had spotted a typo. Sure enough, she was right. I am very grateful she spoke up and told me about it. I posted a corrected version on the white papers page.

As much as I would like our books, white papers, solution briefs, and other content to be error free, the reality is that errors do slip by sometimes. That being said, we do strive to put out quality material that is clear, concise, and almost completely free of typos.

Author: Alan Pringle

Content strategy for technical communication. Publishing (ebooks and print). Eating (preferably pastries and chocolate). Director of operations at Scriptorium.

One Comment

  1. It’s interesting, I read a LOT of whitepapers, books, articles, blogs and so on. Like everyone else I notice typos straight away yet, as a technical writer, I know that they happen (and why they happen, time pressures, volume of words etc etc).
    Some people make a big deal out of a typo, and I too am glad to have them pointed out so I can correct them… but.. dear person who spotted the typo, was the rest of the information helpful?
    Sometimes I question the legitimacy of those that are so stringent about the finer details of spelling and grammar. Surely the message is more important?
    I’m talking about the real edge cases here though, obviously if you can’t spell and your grammar is poor then you are hindering the reader.. (just thought I’d add that before anyone jumps down my throat!)